Blog

Waiting for a wave of offshore wind

A long-awaited bill has been introduced to lay the regulatory groundwork for allowing offshore wind farms to be built in Australian waters. Will this spark a tsunami of projects? Offshore wind is more expensive to build and maintain, but more efficient than “conventional”  onshore wind. While the size of onshore wind turbines average around 3MW,

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What happened to the pumped hydro boom?

Four years ago in the days before green hydrogen was the buzz word, pumped hydro was the buzz word. Or words. In March 2017 then Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull announced the 2000MW Snowy 2.0 pumped hydro scheme, promising a price tag of $2 billion. Later that year a report from The Australian National University in

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From NEM to NEP

The Clean Energy Investor Group (CEIG) represents institutional investors with a combined generation portfolio of 11GW across more than 70 power stations. The NEM is going to need plenty of investment over the next few decades, so when investors speak up, governments tend to listen. The CEIG has spoken – it has set out its

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Fossil fuel climate claims

“Why is it so hard to have a rational debate about energy use and climate change?” was the plaintive cry of Whitehaven Coal’s CEO Paul Flynn in The Australian this week. Well, one reason might be that his industry along with the oil sector has spent decades obfuscating the issue. What’s more remarkable is that

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Talk is cheap, green aluminium is not (yet)

Australia’s largest electricity user, the Tomago aluminium smelter in NSW, says it won’t be renewing its coal fired electricity contract with AGL after 2028 because it will be switching to renewables to power the smelter. This is the same Tomago smelter that had been leaning on AGL and the Federal Government to extend the life

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Hydrogen is GO!

The clean energy transition is being driven as much by brand as policy. Some businesses are voluntarily reducing their own emissions to protect their reputations and make good with stakeholders and investors. Companies eyeing off green hydrogen as a possible future zero emissions fuel want to make sure that they’re getting the good stuff. Where

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